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Pat Bruce: September 24, 1964 – June 6, 2024

Pat and Skye DogTwenty-one days after the Wilderness Act was signed into law, Patrick George Bruce came into this world in Stonehaven Scotland on September 24, 1964 into the welcoming arms of his parents Yvonne and Mike. His brother Nick was born 18 months later. The Bruce Family moved from Scotland to the Haight-Ashbury region of San Francisco in 1968. Pat graduated from Tennyson High School in 1982 and was of course an Eagle Scout.

In 1989 the family moved to Reno, Nevada and Pat’s love affair with the wilds of Nevada began in earnest. Pat received a BA in Anthropology with a minor in Museology from the University of Nevada, Reno where he focused his work in Great Basin prehistoric archaeology and lithics. Pat roamed the Nevada deserts in his 4-wheel drive vehicles accompanied by his well-loved doggie companions, often with bagpipe music blaring. Not surprising since he had family members in the Black Raven Pipe Band of San Francisco.

Pat worked a variety of jobs including at the Boy Scout’s Camp Fleischmann and at Reno’s iconic Deux Gros Nez coffee shop, which was a gathering place for a wide range of people who would become his life-long friends. It was here in 2006, during an overheard conversation, that Pat connected with Friends of Nevada Wilderness and the rest as they say is history.

Stop the White Pine Pumped Storage Project

Dark skies, wildlife, water, recreation and Ely’s scenic backdrop are all threatened by an extreme proposal from a Salt Lake City real estate developer, rPlus Hydro, that would be located in the Duck Creek Range between Ely and High Schells Wilderness. The White Pine Pumped Storage Project is a proposed energy-storage project that aims to provide battery-like energy storage through a closed loop system of reservoirs – one atop the Duck Creek Range and another in the foothills of Steptoe Valley - and includes two massive paved roads through the scenic limestone cliffs to the top of the Duck Creek Range, cutting through critical big game and sage-grouse habitat.

Sign the petition to speak up for wildlands and dark skies in White Pine County today.

This project would forever alter the viewshed for Ely residents and forever sever seasonal movement corridors essential for elk, mule deer and other wildlife species.

Esmeralda/Fish Lake ACEC Threatened by Solar Development

Located west of Tonopah, the Proposed Esmeralda/Fish Lake Area of Critical Environmental Concern encompasses 850,000 acres and includes extensive critical winter and summer bighorn sheep habitat and migration corridors crucial to bighorn sheep breeding and survival. Unfortunately, the core of our proposed ACEC is immediately threatened by an undeveloped section of the Greenlink West Transmission line, the Esmeralda Seven proposed solar development (60,000 acres of industrial development), and the just released 2024 Solar PEIS which would open up 41% of Esmeralda County including much of the ACEC to solar development.

Local and National Donors Show Appreciation for Friends of Nevada Wilderness Volunteers

Over the last 39 years, Friends of Nevada Wilderness volunteers have donated thousands of hours to keeping Nevada’s spectacular public lands wild and healthy. Our annual volunteer appreciation party, the Wilderness Wingding, is on December 15th, 2023, and we are partnering with dozens of local and national businesses and individuals to show our volunteers appreciation. Check out this article to see who is giving back and how.

Celebrating Nevada's National Wildlife Refuges

In the vast landscape of American territory lies the National Wildlife Refuge System, a network of special places where nature thrives, where people reconnect with the wild, and where conservation is the primary mission. A testament to America’s enduring commitment to the environment, this system plays a pivotal role in safeguarding the country's natural heritage.

Wilderness Month is in Action

In August 2023, President Biden issued a proclamation declaring September as National Wilderness Month. Wilderness Areas represent some of America's most precious natural resources, and Americans have done a great job in protecting these lands for future generations. The proclamation celebrates the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 (60 years ago next year!) which created the National Wilderness Preservation System. Today this system protects nearly over 760 Wilderness Areas totaling over 110 million acres of federal public lands.

Latino Conservation Week: The Trail to the Wild by Ed Ruiz

Comencé mi camino hacia la conservación como escalador. Antes de eso, no sentía una conexión con la tierra que me rodeaba. La tierra pública no era algo sobre lo que yo tenía mucho conocimiento. La búsqueda de rocas y acantilados para escalar me transportó a muchos nuevos espacios al aire libre, todos en terrenos públicos y algunos en áreas silvestres. A través de la comunidad de escalada, conocí de la administración y la conservación y aprendí la importancia de cuidar la tierra que utilizaba con tanta vehemencia.

Latino Conservation Week: The Stars Connect Us by Meg Tait

‘Latino Conservation Week’ fue creada para incentivar a la comunidad latina salir al aire libre y participar en actividades para proteger nuestros recursos naturales. Para mí también es un espacio para reflexionar de dónde vengo y qué me ha inspirado.

Celebrating 39 Years of Keeping Nevada Wild

Palisade Mesa Jump by Kurt KuznickiFrom the snowy peaks of the Rubies and the wildflower meadows of Mt. Rose to the sand dunes of the Desert Refuge and red hoodoos of Gold Butte, we're celebrating 39 years of Keeping Nevada Wild! Check out this timeline of Friends' history and how many of our favorite protected places came to be.

Thanking Southern Nevada Stewardship Volunteers with a “Wahoo!”

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Public lands stewardship is powered by the community. People from all walks of life give their time to maintain trails, install signs, and otherwise maintain Nevada’s wild spaces and trails. Such was the case on Saturday, February 25th when we hosted the community during their annual Wahoo volunteer appreciation day. Through rain and wind that has been a hallmark of this wild winter season about 25 volunteers and supporters met under the giant group picnic canopy at the Red Springs to celebrate the stewardship work accomplished this past year with sandwiches and hot soup plus a flurry of high-fives and wahoo’s.

Thank you to everyone that volunteered to keep southern Nevada’s wilderness wild in 2022!!

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